Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large
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Tomato Beefsteak Extra Large

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Seeds are inherited and harvested from a Premium Strain of Extra Large Tomatoes average weight of 1.6 to 2 lbs.

Beefsteak is one of the most popular heirloom tomato varieties for the home garden. It is aptly named for the deep red color, large size and meaty texture. They have a classic tomato flavor but with a kick of sweetness and few seed cavities which makes them ideal for culinary uses. They are heavy, sometimes reaching 4 pounds, but most weigh in at about a quarter to one pound in the average home garden. The vines grow vigorously and should be staked or trellised to support their weight. 

Growing 

Tomatoes are available in a wide variety of shapes, color and sizes. They are broadly classified into two categories:

  • Determinate are those that grow to pre-determined height. They are good choices for canning and sauces.
  • Indeterminate are those that continue to grow in height and produce fruits throughout the growing season.

Planting

  • Select a site with full sun. For northern regions, it is VERY important that your site receives at least 6 hours of daily sunlight.
  • Tomatoes will grow in many different soil types, but it needs to be well drained. They prefer a slightly acid soil with a pH of 6.2 to 6.8.
  • Start seeds indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the average last spring frost date.
  • Two weeks before planting tomato plants outdoors, dig into soil and mix in aged manure or compost. 
  • Harden off seedlings for a week before planting in the garden. Set young plants outdoors in the shade for a couple of hours the first day, gradually increasing the amount of time the plants are outside each day to include some direct sunlight. 
  • Place tomato stakes or cages in the soil at the time of planting to avoid damaging roots later on.

Transplants

  • Apply fertilizer such as 5-10-5, or 10-10-10 per package instructions. Do not apply high nitrogen fertilizers, as they promote luxurious foliage growth but will delay flowering and fruiting. 
  • Space tomato transplants at least 2 feet apart.
  • Plant the root ball deep enough so that the lowest leaves are just above the surface of the soil. 
  • If transplants are leggy, bury up to ⅔ of the plant including lowest leaves. Tomato stems have the ability to grow roots from the buried stems.
  • Be sure to water the transplant thoroughly to establish good root/soil contact and prevent wilting.
  • Newly set transplants may need to be shaded for the first week or so to prevent excessive drying of the leaves. 

Care

Watering

  • Water generously the first few days that the tomato seedlings or transplants are in the ground.
  • Water well throughout the growing season, about 2 inches (about 1.2 gallons) per week during the summer.
  • Water in the early morning. This gives plant the moisture it needs to make it through a hot day. Avoid watering late afternoon or evening. 
  • Mulch after transplanting to retain moisture and to control weeds. Mulch also keeps soil from splashing the lower tomato leaves. 

Fertilizing

  • Watering in with a starter fertilizer solution will help get the roots off to a good start.
  • Side dress plants with fertilizer or compost every two weeks starting when fruits are about 1 inch in diameter.
  • If staking, use soft string or old nylon stocking to secure the tomato stem to the stake.
  • It is essential to remove the suckers (side stems) by pinching them off just beyond the first two leaves.

Click here to download our free vegetable growing guide